Posts for: September, 2013

IronChefCatCoraDiscussesHerPositiveDentalImplantExperience

Cat Cora is a world-class chef, restaurateur, best-selling author, and philanthropist — on top of being the first female chef on the hit television show Iron Chef America. She is also the mother of four active young sons. And while all these important roles require her daily attention, she makes oral health a top priority for herself and her family through diet, brushing, flossing and routine visits to the dentist.

During a recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Cat revealed that she had her wisdom teeth removed when she was in her thirties and another tooth extracted and replaced with a dental implant. When asked to compare the two experiences, Cat said that the implant was “much easier for me.” She went on to say, “It feels very natural” and “now, I don't even think about it.”

Some may be surprised by Cat's response; however, we find it to be a quite common one.

There is no question that over the last two decades, dental implants have revolutionized tooth replacement and the field of dentistry. A dental implant, used to replace missing teeth, is placed in the jawbone with a minor surgical procedure. What's amazing is that over time these dental implants actually fuse with or integrate into the bone, thus making them an ideal permanent solution for replacing a missing tooth. They are typically made of commercially pure titanium, a substance that has been used for medical and dental implants for years. The crown, the part above the gum tissues, is attached to the implant via a retaining screw and a connecting piece called an abutment. The crown itself is artistically crafted using porcelain to mimic the look and feel of a natural tooth — just as Cat Cora describes.

To learn more about dental implants, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants, Your Third Set of Teeth.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination and discuss what treatment options will be best for you. And to read the entire interview with Cat Cora, please see the article “Cat Cora.”


By Paul M. Blidy, DDS
September 13, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental injuries  
TimingisEverythingWhenitComestoTreatingMouthInjuries

When you or a family member takes a traumatic hit to the mouth, what should you do? Besides immediate first aid, your next action will depend on the extent of damage to any teeth. What you do and when you do it may even determine whether an injured tooth is eventually saved or lost.

If a tooth has been completely knocked out, you have about five minutes to replace the tooth in the socket to give it the best chance of reattachment and long-term survival. While we can certainly perform this action in our office, getting to us within five minutes may not be possible. Fortunately, any person can perform this action on site (see the article linked below for basic instructions on replantation). If for some that's not possible, you should control bleeding at the tooth site with direct pressure, place the recovered tooth in milk or the patient's saliva, and see us as soon as possible.

If, however, the injured tooth has been obviously knocked out of line but not completely detached from its socket, you have a small cushion of time to seek dental treatment — but not much. For this degree of injury, you should see us within six hours of the incident. We will be able to determine the exact nature of the injury, and treat the condition by moving the teeth back into proper position and splinting them.

You have up to twelve hours for broken or chipped teeth still in their normal position. Try to locate and save any broken-off fragments — it may be possible to re-bond them to the teeth. Although it may not be as urgent as other situations, you should still seek treatment as soon as possible. A broken tooth could leave the inner pulp exposed — a situation that left untreated could lead to eventual tooth loss.

Traumatic injuries to the mouth can have serious consequences for your long-term dental health. With our consultation and treatment efforts, we can help you save an injured tooth.

If you would like more information on caring for dental injuries, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”




Dentist - Mundelein
452 N. Seymour Ave, Suite B
Mundelein, IL 60060
(847) 566-4060

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